The Scout Report Podcast – Episode 2

Summary

Assessing Risk in Click Through Agreements

In episode two of The Scout Report, host Otto Hanson, Founder and CEO of TermScout visits with guest Bill Mooz, Executive Director of the Institute for the Future of Law Practice. They discuss how to avoid playing Russian roulette with click through agreements. Services purchased from a low dollar contract can still have high associated risks. They analyze why the dollar threshold is not a safe threshold for making decisions regarding which contracts to review. Listen to hear best practices for making appropriate contract review swift and affordable. 

 

Run time: 11:19

The Scout Report Podcast – Episode 1

Summary

Otto Hanson, CEO of TermScout, hosts the show with guest Bill Mooz, Executive Director at The Institute for the Future of Law Practice. Otto and Bill discuss best practices for making the contract review process as efficient as possible and developing win-win scenarios for drafting terms and conditions. A contract serves as an operating manual for any business relationship and defines what each party needs and expects. There are circumstances when it benefits the buyer to work with the vendors’ pre-existing contract language. Listen to learn more.

 

Run time: 9:33

Hiring Lead Developer/CTO.

We are hiring!

 

TermScout is looking for a Lead Engineer/CTO to guide the execution of our overall product and technology functions. The ideal candidate is a seasoned software developer with demonstrated experience in defining and implementing practical and effective solutions to complex technology challenges. Follow this link to see the full job description and apply.

We look forward to hearing from you.

 

About TermScout

Founded in 2018 after winning the Global Legal Hackathon, TermScout is a Techstars-backed company that offers data-driven contract intelligence. The company’s mission is to make it easier to understand the contracts businesses sign every day. TermScout is based in Denver, Colorado, with a team of experienced and passionate attorneys and entrepreneurs. You can learn more about the team at termscout.com/about/.

TermScout joins Techstars 2020 Accelerator Class in Boulder, CO.

Each year, Techstars selects hundreds of companies to join their three-month mentorship-driven accelerators, investing $120K and providing hands-on mentorship and access to the Techstars worldwide network of founders, investors, mentors, and industry leaders. For 13 weeks startups work to gain traction, accelerate their businesses, and grow their networks to help them do more faster, emerging from the program stronger, bolder, and better prepared to drive innovation in the global economy.

TermScout was selected to join the Techstars 2020 Class in Boulder, CO. This is the 14th class in Boulder since Techstars launched in Boulder in 2007. Companies will be joining us from Colorado, Oregon, Montana, Mexico, Illinois, Utah, and California. One hundred forty-two companies have graduated in the past 14 years and they’ve gone on to raise over $1.2B, change their industries and create thousands of jobs. We are proud to be a Techstars portfolio company. 

To learn more about Techstars and the other companies selected this year visit

https://www.techstars.com/content/accelerators/announcing-class-techstars-boulder-2020/

 

About TermScout

Founded in 2018 after winning the Global Legal Hackathon, TermScout is a Techstars-backed company that offers data-driven contract intelligence. The company’s mission is to make it easier to understand the contracts businesses sign every day. TermScout is based in Denver, Colorado, with a team of experienced and passionate attorneys and entrepreneurs. You can learn more about the team at termscout.com/about/.

How to review a commercial contract on a budget.

U.S. businesses execute millions of contracts each week. Some established businesses have in-house counsel or trusted outside counsel to guide them on these matters, but a surprising number do not.  And startups rarely have the resources to retain qualified counsel, instead, they trust non-attorney CFO’s and others to review and negotiate contracts.

With so many contracts, and so little time, it’s difficult to read and understand each contract, but failing to read them — or assuming they are all the same — is like playing Russian Roulette.  It only takes one legal problem to bankrupt a business.

To assist non-attorney corporate officers in businesses with tight budgets, here are TermScout’s tips on how to review business contracts:

  1. Understand what you are signing and why.

Too often lawyers and non-lawyers dive right into a contract, scanning each paragraph for provisions they don’t understand or don’t like.  That’s a mistake. Take a moment first to consider what the contract’s purpose is and how it will further your company’s goals. If you understand those things, you will be in a much better position to evaluate the contract’s specific provisions.

  1. Talk to an attorney with expertise in contracts and your company’s specific industry.

The best lawyer to advise you is one with experience in contracts and in your company’s specific industry.  For example, if your company is a healthcare provider, there are numerous laws specific to that industry, such as HIPAA, which governs patient privacy.  If your company is an Internet Service Provider, your lawyer should understand the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. If your company is in the real estate industry, your lawyer should be familiar with the laws governing that industry, including environmental laws.

  1. Protect your IP.

For most companies, intellectual property is one of their most valuable assets.  Your company should review each contract it signs to make sure you’re not assigning unintended rights in your company’s IP.  If you’re sharing confidential or proprietary information with another party, you should also make sure the contract requires that party to protect that information.  

  1. Make certain your contracts comply with privacy laws.

Your business must comply with applicable privacy laws, and if your company collects personal information from European citizens, that includes complying with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).  However, if you are going to share personal information about others with a business partner, it’s vital that you require them to also comply with those laws — and to defend and indemnify you if they don’t.

  1. Have an attorney on standby that can guide you when you are unsure about an issue.

Even if your company does not have in-house counsel or a hefty legal budget, there may still be times when it is wise to have an experienced lawyer review a contract, particularly if you are unfamiliar with the contract provisions.  Many lawyers are eager to develop relationships with young companies and hope to grow with the company.

  1. Use TermScout’s Red Flag Reports to Quickly Summarize Contracts for You.

The dilemma many businesses face is that not reviewing contracts exposes the business to tremendous risk, but paying an attorney to review each contract may be too costly.
TermScout’s
Red Flag Reports streamline your company’s contract review process, saving time and money.  Red Flag Reports can help quickly identify which contract provisions require attention. Sharing the report with your attorney can also greatly reduce your company’s legal expenses by enabling your attorney to focus their time on the provisions that matter and providing them with citations to the provisions in the contract that may be concerning.

Each Red Flag Report contains:

  •  A short description of what the contract means.
  •  A list of red-flagged items in the contract with plain English explanations of the issues and citations to the exact provision in the agreement so you can quickly dive deeper when needed.
  •  Answers to the top questions that matter in the specific agreement type.  Subscribers or large orders can customize the questions that TermScout answers in each agreement type.
  • A fairness rating to show how the contract compares to similar contracts in the industry.
  • Peace of mind.  Rest assured that we’ve read the entire agreement and alerted you of the major issues.

While TermScout is not a law firm and can’t offer legal advice, our extensive experience in reviewing contracts in many industries (and court decisions arising out of litigation involving such contracts), enables us to know what provisions are standard, what provisions need attention, and how a given contract compares to similar contracts in the given industry. For more information about Red Flag Reports or TermScout’s other products email .

Authors

Mark Cohen

Advising Attorney, TermScout  

Flirting With Disaster: The Dangers of Not Reading Business Contracts.

We get it. Managers are busy. Reading contracts takes time. After a while, managers may feel all contracts are the same. With so much to do, it is tempting to skip the fine print, particularly given that so many lawyers draft contracts in an unnecessarily verbose style filled with “legalese.” But not reading a contract is dangerous and could expose you to personal liability.  

Here are the five things you must know if your role in your company has anything to do with executing contracts:

1 – Corporate directors and officers have a legal obligation to act responsibly and in the best interests of the companies they manage. In some cases, managers have been held personally liable for breaching these legal duties. One such duty is the “duty of care”, which generally includes the duty to make careful, informed decisions by assuming an active role throughout the entire decision-making process. Generally, managers can avoid liability  if they follow these guidelines:

     – Assure themselves that they have the information required to take action
     – Devote sufficient time to reviewing such information; and
     – Obtain, if useful, the advice of experts

2 – It doesn’t matter whether you read or understood the contract. A fundamental principle of law is that one who signs a contract is presumed to have read it, understood it, and agreed to it. Put simply, if you sign it, your organization is stuck with it, and any attempt to modify or nullify it will likely be costly, time-consuming, and unsuccessful.

3 – Contracts vary wildly. There are 1.35 million lawyers in the United States, and clients generally pay them to draft contracts favorable to them, not your organization. If you don’t understand a contract you sign, you’re playing Russian Roulette with your company.

4 – Contracts are not all “boilerplate”. Most contracts contain legally binding terms covering issues such as:

– Dispute resolution
– Limitations on damages
– Indemnification
– Attorney’s Fees
– Forum selection
– Remedies
– Insurance
– Representations and warranties

These things matter.  A lot. Properly drafted, these provisions help an organization minimize the risk of litigation and maximize the odds of a good outcome if the parties can’t resolve the dispute.

In a study of SaaS click-through agreements, TermScout found that software vendors require the customer to take on significantly lopsided terms with respect to risk allocation more than 95% of the time.  Typically this means that if something goes wrong, such as a data breach or third-party lawsuit, the customer is much more likely than the software vendor to suffer a financial loss.


5 – The past does not predict the future. If you’ve been signing contracts blindly and getting away with it, kudos to you.  But don’t assume that just because there was no problem in the past a problem won’t arise down the road. It’s unusual for serious contract disputes to arise, but when they do the outcome can make or break a company.

If an organization has access to legal counsel, managers may rely on them to review proposed contracts and identify potential issues. Those lawyers should scrutinize contracts for ambiguities, inconsistencies, and important issues the proposed contract fails to address altogether.  

If an organization does not have access to counsel, even experienced managers may be tempted to sign a contract without carefully reviewing it and fully understanding it.  However, unless those managers are lawyers, they may not understand the risks they take on when signing contracts for their companies. They may be obligating their organization to unnecessary commitments or agreeing to a contract that omits important protections for the organization. When those contracts turn out to be problematic for the company down the road, shareholders may be able to bring a claim for breach of the duty of care if the manager cannot show that they took proper precautions.

Though reviewing contracts takes time, new solutions are emerging that make contract review more affordable and accessible for growing businesses. One solution is TermScout’s Red Flag Reports, which help you quickly and confidently determine which contracts are okay to sign and which ones are not. Click here to learn about Red Flag Reports and how you can limit your risk for as little as $119 per document.

Authors

Mark Cohen

Advising Attorney, TermScout  

Taking a Ride with Lyft May Be Riskier Than You Realize.

To catch a ride through Lyft’s popular ridesharing app users must download the app to their mobile phone, create an account, and provide their contact and credit card information.  The only way to complete this process is to agree to Lyft’s Terms of Service.  The process is easy, but the Terms of Service are a binding contract between you and Lyft, Inc., so it’s important to understand them.  Lyft’s Terms of Service include 14,671 words (about 29 typewritten pages) and are written at grade 15 reading level. One reason for the length is that Lyft’s Terms of Service include provisions applicable to its drivers as well as riders.  To help you understand Lyft’s Terms of Service, TermScout believes these are the five most important provisions you should understand.

 

Five Things Riders Should Know About Lyft’s Terms of Service

1. Lyft Claims No Responsibility for Driver Conduct.  Although Lyft screens drivers, Lyft disclaims any responsibility for their conduct. If the driver causes an accident that injures you, you probably won’t be successful if you Lyft.  That’s also true if the driver assaults you. Safety tip: If you don’t feel comfortable with the driver, don’t get in the vehicle. If you the driver’s driving concerns you, instruct the driver to pull over and let you out.

2. Fares May Increase Significantly During Prime Hours.  Lyft offers two types of fares – variable fares and quoted fares. Variable fares consist of a base charge and incremental charges based on the duration and distance of your ride.  In some cases, Lyft may quote you a fare when you request a ride. However, the Terms of Service provide that at times of high demand the charges may increase substantially. For rides with a variable fare, Lyft promises to use reasonable efforts to inform you of any Prime-Time multipliers in effect.  For quoted fares Lyft may factor in the Prime-Time multiplier.

3. Lyft May Charge You if You Cancel a Ride. You may cancel a ride at any time using the app, but Lyft may charge you a fee if you do.  Lyft will charge you a fee if (1) two minutes or more pass after a driver accepts your request and (2) your driver is on time to arrive within five minutes of the original estimated arrival time. In most cities, Lyft will charge you $10.00 for cancelling a ride.

4. Lyft Requires You to Waive Your Right to a Trial and to Instead Participate in Arbitration.  Though Lyft’s Terms of Service make it difficult for you to successfully bring a claim against Lyft, if you do, Lyft requires that you waive your right to a trial and instead agree to binding arbitration.

5. Lyft Will Send You Promotional Texts and Emails Unless You Opt Out.  To be able to provide services, Lyft requires that you provide your phone number and email address. However, Lyft will sometime use that information to send you promotional texts and emails.  Lyft makes it easy to unsubscribe from promotional communications.

TermScout hopes you find this summary helpful.  Remember – this is just a summary. It is not a substitute for reading Lyft’s Terms of Service.

Authors

Mark Cohen

Advising Attorney, TermScout  

Traveling with a Medical Device

Quick Facts

  • Your carrier may require you to provide up to 48 hours’ advance notice and check in 1 hour earlier than normal if you need to use and/or connect a respirator or similar device to the plane’s power supply
  • You may need to provide up to 48 hours’ advance notice (72 hours for international flights) and check in 1 hour earlier if you want to use medical oxygen during the flight that is supplied by the carrier.
  • Many devices require manufacturing labels to prove they are FAA compliant.
  • Your carrier may require you to bring enough fully charged batteries to power your device for at least 150% of the expected flight time.
  • Your carrier may not require you to sign a waiver of liability for loss or damage of your assistive device, or as a requirement to receive in-flight services such as medical oxygen.
  • If you have a disability, you may ask at the gate to preboard the plane in order to have more time to stow your equipment or be seated.
  • Your assistive device will not count toward your carrier’s carry-on policy, so even if your carrier does not allow carry-on items, you may still bring your device.
  • If your device is lost or damaged during the flight, you could recover an amount up to its original purchase price.

Introduction

            According to the Air Carrier Access Act, carriers may not discriminate against individuals with a disability.1 In order to carry out this Act, the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) published part 382 in the Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.).2 These rules outline many of the rights airline passengers with disabilities have and how carriers must accommodate these rights. All U.S. carriers must comply with these rules, and foreign carriers must comply for flights to/from the U.S.3 We have read through these rules, and this article will lay out what rights you have if you are someone who needs to travel with an assistive device.

For the purposes of this article, an assistive device does not refer to mobility aids, such as wheelchairs. For information on those, please refer to Traveling with a Mobility Impairment.

Before Your Flight

            According to the C.F.R., you are not required to provide advance notice that you will be on a flight.4 However, a carrier may require you to provide up to 48 hours’ advance notice and check in 1 hour earlier than normal if you need to use and/or connect a respirator or similar device to the plane’s power supply, need your carrier to provide packaging for your assistive device (if the carrier requires packaging), or need to travel with an incubator. You may also need to provide up to 48 hours’ advance notice (72 hours for international flights) and check in 1 hour earlier if you want to use medical oxygen during the flight that is supplied by the carrier. 5

You should contact your carrier before your flight to ask for any other requirements or restrictions such as labels, size, and weight. Many devices require manufacturing labels to prove they are FAA compliant. Additionally, your carrier may require you to bring enough fully charged batteries to power your device for at least 150% of the expected flight time. If you tell your carrier in advance that you will be using an assistive device in-flight, then your carrier must inform you of the expected flight time within 48 hours of your booking, “or 24 hours before departure, whichever is earlier. If you do not comply with the carrier’s requirements, then you may be denied boarding.6 For a full list of POC machines that do not need a label, please refer to § 382.133(c)-(d) on pages 446-447 in the C.F.R.7

It is also important to note that a carrier may not require you to sign a waiver of liability for loss or damage of your assistive device, or as a requirement to receive in-flight services such as medical oxygen.8

 At the Airport

            At the airport, you and your assistive device will be subject to the same TSA screening as everyone else.9 However, your carrier may also conduct an additional screening if your device sets off the security system, or if it believes that your device may conceal a prohibited item.10

Boarding and Deplaning

            If you have a disability, you may ask at the gate to preboard the plane in order to have more time to stow your equipment or be seated.11 If you do preboard, your assistive device may be stowed with priority over other passengers’ items, except for wheelchairs.12 If you do not preboard, then the space in the priority storage area will be filled on a first-come, first-served basis.13 If the space is filled in the priority storage area, then your device may be stowed with priority over other baggage in the overhead baggage compartment.14

On the Plane

            If your assistive device can be stowed in a designated area, then your carrier must allow you to bring it in the cabin.15 Your assistive device will not count toward your carrier’s carry-on policy, so even if your carrier does not allow carry-on items, you may still bring your device.16 While on the plane, you may ask for help with stowing and retrieving your assistive device.17 If your assistive device needs to be disassembled and reassembled in order to be stowed in the cabin, then you may provide written instructions which the carrier must follow if possible. If your device is disassembled by the carrier, then the carrier must ensure its reassembly and return.18 If your device is lost or damaged during the flight, you could recover an amount up to its original purchase price.19

If you are traveling on a plane designed to carry more the 19 passengers, then you may use the following assistive devices in the cabin as long as they are compliant with TSA, FAA, and PHMSA regulations: a personal oxygen concentrator, a ventilator, a respirator, or a CPAP machine.20

More Resources

For additional information check out our articles on traveling with a service or emotional support animal, traveling with a hearing or vision impairment, and traveling with a mobility impairment

References

1 49 U.S.C. § 41705(a) (2003).
2 14 C.F.R. §382.1 (2018).
3 14 C.F.R. § 382.7(a)-(b) (2018).
4 14 C.F.R. § 382.25 (2018).
5 14 C.F.R. § 382.27(b) (2018); 14 C.F.R. § 382.27(c)(1), (2), (5) (2018).
6 14 C.F.R. § 382.133(e)(1)-(3) (2018); 14 C.F.R. § 382.133(h)(1)-(3) (2018).
7 14 C.F.R. § 382.133(c)-(d) (2018).
8 14 C.F.R. § 382.35(a)-(b) (2018).
9 14 C.F.R. § 382.55(a) (2018).
10 14 C.F.R. § 382.55(b)(2)(i)-(ii) (2018).
11 14 C.F.R. § 382.93 (2018).
12 14 C.F.R. § 382.123(a)(2) (2018).
13 14 C.F.R. § 382.123(a)(3) (2018).
14 14 C.F.R. § 382.125(a)-(b) (2018).
15 14 C.F.R. § 382.121(a)(3) (2018).
16 14 C.F.R. § 382.121(b) (2018).
17 14 C.F.R. § 382.111(e) (2018).
18 14 C.F.R. § 382.129(a)-(b) (2018).
19 14 C.F.R. § 382.131 (2018).
20 14 C.F.R. § 382.133(a)-(c) (2018).

Authors

Matt Matsuyama

Contract Analyst Intern, TermScout  

Ben Golopol

Contract Analyst, TermScout  

Your Rights When Traveling with a Mobility Impairment

 

Quick Facts

  • Your carrier may require you to provide up to 48 hours’ advance notice and check in 1 hour earlier than normal to guarantee certain services.
  • Your carrier must provide help with moving throughout the airport if you need it and request it due to your disability.
  • You will still be subject to standard TSA screening requirements, even if you are escorted by a carrier.
  • You may pre-board if you self-identify at the gate as having a disability which requires more time or help with boarding, stowing your mobility aid, or being seated.
  • If you tell the carrier that you have a disability which requires a seating accommodation, then the carrier must make that accommodation if it is available on your specific plane.
  • In order to guarantee you will be able to receive these accommodations, you must request them at least 24 hours before your flight’s departure time and check in at least one hour earlier than the general public.
  • Carriers are required to permit manual wheelchairs and other mobility aids into the cabin, provided they can be stowed in a designated area.

    Introduction

    According to the Carrier Access Act, carriers may not discriminate against individuals with a disability.1 In order to carry out this Act, the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) published part 382 in the Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.).2 These rules outline many of the rights airline passengers with disabilities have and how carriers must accommodate these rights. All U.S. carriers must comply with these rules, and foreign carriers must comply for flights to/from the U.S.3 We have read through these rules, and this article will lay out what rights you have if you are someone with a vision and/or hearing impairment.

    Before Your Trip

    You are not required to provide advance notice that you will be on a flight.1 However, a carrier may require you to provide up to 48 hours’ advance notice and check in 1 hour earlier than normal for the following services: traveling in a stretcher, transporting an electric wheelchair on a plane with less than 60 seats, traveling in a group of 10 or more disabled individuals, or using an on-board wheelchair on a plane (with more than 60 seats) without an accessible lavatory.2 Additionally, a carrier may require you to check in 1 hour earlier than normal if you want to check a battery-powered wheelchair.3 If you do not provide advance notice or check in early for these services, the carrier must still make a reasonable effort to accommodate you without delaying the flight.4

    At the Airport

                If you need help moving throughout the airport because of your disability, then you should request help from your carrier, as it is required to either provide or ensure help is provided.5 However, you will still be subject to standard TSA screening requirements, even if you are escorted by a carrier. Your carrier may also impose additional screening requirements. If the carrier reasonably believes that a prohibited item is hidden in your mobility aid (e.g., wheelchair, crutches), then it may examine it. But, if your mobility aid sets off the TSA security system, then the carrier may search you and the mobility aid. No other screenings may be performed on the basis of your disability alone.6

    Boarding and Deplaning

                If you stow your wheelchair in the cabin of the plane, then you are entitled to pre-board the plane.7 You may also pre-board if you self-identify at the gate as having a disability which requires more time or help with boarding, stowing your mobility aid, or being seated.8 Even if you do not pre-board, your carrier is required to provide assistance with boarding and deplaning, upon your request, through the use of various types of wheelchairs and/or motorized carts where applicable. If a level loading bridge is not available, then the carrier must (with some exceptions) use a lift or ramp to help you board and deplane at U.S. airports with at least 10,000 annual enplanements.9 After you request assistance with boarding, deplaning, or connecting with another flight, the carrier may not leave you unattended for longer than 30 minutes while you are in a mobility aid and cannot move by yourself.10

     On the Plane

    Seating Accommodations

                If you tell the carrier that you have a disability which requires a seating accommodation, then the carrier must make that accommodation if it is available on your specific plane. For example, if you are unable to get in/out of a seat with an armrest, then you may request to be moved to a row with movable armrests. Or, if your leg is immobilized, then you may request to be moved to either a bulkhead seat, or another seat with more leg room than normal, on the side of the plane that is better for your leg.11 Additionally, the carrier must provide an adjoining seat for your in-flight assistant if your assistant will perform tasks that the flight crew are not required to do, or if your assistant was required by the carrier.12 In order to guarantee you will be able to receive these accommodations, you must request them at least 24 hours before your flight’s departure time and check in at least one hour earlier than the general public. If you do not do this, then the carrier must still try to accommodate you reasonably, but it is not required to reassign another passenger’s seat for you.13

    In-Flight Assistance

                While on-board the plane, the carrier must provide the following services at the passenger’s request:

    (1) help with moving to/from your seat while boarding and deplaning,

    (2) help with the on-board wheelchair to use the lavatory, and

    (3) help with stowing and retrieving carry-on items.14

    You should also note that the carrier personnel are not required to provide assistance within the lavatory or provide medical services.15

    Mobility Aids

                Carriers are required to permit manual wheelchairs and other mobility aids into the cabin, provided they can be stowed in a designated area.16 These items will not count toward the carrier’s carry-on policy, however, the number of mobility aids allowed could be restricted, so you should check with your carrier if you need to bring more than one.17

    More Resources 

    For additional information check out our articles on traveling with a service or emotional support animal, traveling with a hearing or vision impairment, and traveling with a medical device.

    References

    1 14 C.F.R. § 382.25 (2018).
    2 14 C.F.R. § 382.27(c) (3), (4), (6), (7) (2018).
    3 14 C.F.R. § 382.127(a)-(b) (2018).
    4 14 C.F.R. § 382.27(g) (2018).
    5 14 C.F.R. § 382.91(a)-(d) (2018).
    6
    14 C.F.R. § 382.55 (2018).
    7 14 C.F.R. § 382.67(f) (2018).
    8 14 C.F.R. § 382.93 (2018).
    9 14 C.F.R. § 382.95(a)-(b) (2018).
    10 14 C.F.R. § 382.103 (2018).
    11 14 C.F.R. § 382.81(a), (d) (2018).
    12 14 C.F.R. § 382.81(b)(1), (4) (2018).
    13 14 C.F.R. § 382.83(a)(1)(iii) (2018); 14 C.F.R. § 382.83(a)(2)(iv) (2018).
    14 14 C.F.R. § 382.111(a), (c), (e) (2018).
    15 14 C.F.R. § 382.113(a)-(c) (2018).
    16 14 C.F.R. § 382.121(a)(1)-(3) (2018).
    17 14 C.F.R. § 382.121(b) (2018).

    Authors

    Matt Matsuyama

    Contract Analyst Intern, TermScout  

    Ben Golopol

    Contract Analyst, TermScout  

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